PB & GF?

P1020408

In honor of my little peanut who just turned nine, I thought it only appropriate to share one of her favorite cookies of all time; classic peanut butter cookies. These old-fashioned chewy treats have been a staple in our house for years, but the recipe is by no means traditional. More…

In honor of my little peanut who just turned nine, I thought it only appropriate to share one of her favorite cookies of all time; classic peanut butter cookies. These old-fashioned chewy treats have been a staple in our house for years, but the recipe is by no means traditional. Our grandbaby also happened to spend the first six and a half years of her life on a gluten-free/dairy-free diet. During that time, I invested many hours in the kitchen reworking many of my recipes so that we could all eat the same food when she came for dinner, was visiting at brunch, or eating an after school snack. And this little nut also likes to bake, and cook, and eat. Between my desire to share the experience of making food and her desire to help, and ultimately eat, along with her dietary restrictions–we challenged each other. The results were so good that we still use many of the GF/DF recipes today; and she is no longer on the restricted diet!

P1020406

It turns out that many of the recipes I reworked are also pretty good for someone on a diabetic diet, or anyone watching their carb intake, as my preferred source of flour replacement is a combination of almond flour and coconut flour. Together, these flours offer a very low glycemic load and are pretty high in dietary fiber. I am not saying there is no sugar to be had, but the load ends up being much lower without the all-purpose flour. The recipe below makes 30 cookies that are 182 calories each with an estimated glycemic load of only 8. Pretty good for a moist, buttery Thai-inspired nibble! That reminds me, the thing that makes these biscuits alluring is an East-meets-West influence. The use of coconut oil ended up being pure genius–if you like a good Asian peanut sauce. The aroma in the kitchen while these babies are cooking is intoxicating.

P1020408

Thai Peanut Butter Cookies

INGREDIENTS

Wet Ingredients

  • 200 grams of coconut oil
  • 200 grams of baker’s sugar
  • 200 grams of brown sugar
  • 1 Tbsp vanilla
  • 2 eggs
  • 200 grams peanut butter

Dry Ingredients

  • 100 grams of almond flour
  • 100 grams of coconut flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda

MISE EN PLACE

  1. Measure out ingredients.
  2. Sift together flour, baking soda, and salt in bowl.

STEP ONE
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cream fat, sugar, vanilla, and eggs together. Beat until smooth. Add peanut butter and beat again until smooth. Add dry ingredients and mix until combined.

STEP TWO
Using a cookie scoop for uniform-sized cookies, place balls on ungreased cookie sheets and bake for 10-15 minutes or until desired doneness.

COOK’S NOTES:
This recipe was altered to be gluten and dairy free from a classic peanut butter cookie recipe written on lined notebook paper with years of peanut butter marks and vanilla extract stains that give away its age. I do not know where it came from, but I salute the original creator…whoever you are =)

Friday Food Find: Matcha Matcha!

matcha9

There are lots of things that you can use matcha in–lattes, smoothies, Popsicles, salads, soups, curries, and of course, tea. In my mind it is similar to ground flax; in that you can add it to a lot of your current recipes for an added nutritional boost. But sometimes, it is also good in something a little more decedent. And that’s where today’s recipe begins…Matcha Drops. More…

There are lots of things that you can use matcha in–lattes, smoothies, Popsicles, salads, soups, curries, and of course, tea. In my mind, it is similar to ground flax; in that you can add it to a lot of your current recipes for an added nutritional boost.

matcha6

But sometimes, matcha is also good in something a little more decadent and it has nothing to do with its nutritional benefits. That’s where today’s recipe begins…Matcha Drops.

matcha2

Recently, I decided that I was going to send my daughter, who is going to college in Portland, a package each month that was inspired by something in Food & Wine magazine. It would include some product that was touted, something made with that product, and of course the magazine. Having finished reading February’s issue and receiving my matcha in the mail via Amazon, it was time to make my inspired treat so I could package it all up and send to her. I chose matcha for several reasons, but the most important one being that my daughter likes green tea. And I chose cookies as they ship well and it seemed like a fun first package–hopefully making her excited for next month’s!

Matcha Drops
Inspired by Matcha Tea Cake Cookies in February 2015 Food & Wine Magazine

INGREDIENTS

Dry Ingredients

  • 284 grams of flour
  • 2 tsp of baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp of sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp of freshly ground cardamon

Wet Ingredients

  • 150 grams of baker’s sugar
  • 75 grams of coconut oil
  • 75 grams of olive oil
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/2 tsp of vanilla extract
  • 1/4 tsp of almond extract

Addition to Wet Ingredients

  • 12 grams of matcha
  • 2 Tbsp of water

Extras

  • powdered sugar for dusting

MISE EN PLACE

  1. Measure out all ingredients
  2. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper

STEP ONE
Wisk the dry ingredients in a medium mixing bowl. Combine wet ingredients in another medium mixing bowl. Stir matcha and water together to create a paste. You might notice a pungent grassy aroma from the matcha. Don’t worry, it mellows upon baking. Add to wet ingredients. Then combine wet and dry bowls until just combined.

matcha7

STEP TWO
Using a small ice cream style scoop, spoon dough onto cookie sheets with 2″ in between. Refrigerate for approximately 30 minutes. Depending on the scoop size, you may have to do this in batches. I ended up with 36 cookies, so I made three sheets. This is also a good time to preheat your oven to 350 degrees.

matcha5

STEP THREE
Bake cookies for approximately 12 minutes or when the bottoms are slightly golden. Let cool on sheet for a few minutes and then transfer to cooling racks. Dust, dip, or decorate as you see fit.

matcha4

In the end, I dusted some, dipped some, and decorated a few. As for the taste…quite unexpected. I had tried the dough, as I always do, and was left with an herbal, yet dusty, aftertaste. It was not unpleasant, just different. But once cooked, the earthiness had all but gone away and what was left was a bright, sweet, grassiness that was rather addicting. Each drop was tender and moist, but not fragile.

I have high hopes for these little cakes’ ability to travel, so once cooled, they will be packaged and sent off to Portland. But until they are sealed up, I have no doubt that I will be nibbling on them. I’m hooked!

matcha