Food Find Friday: Crispy Onions

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Have you ever had an epiphany that left you wanting to share it with the whole planet; to shout from the highest mountain or maybe click Share with the World on Facebook (if that option existed)? I have; in the form of an edible epiphanyMore…

Have you ever had an epiphany that left you wanting to share it with the whole planet; to shout from the highest mountain or maybe click Share with the World on Facebook (if that option existed)?

I have; in the form of an edible epiphanycrispy fried onions. Originally, I bought them for an Indian dish that I was making. The recipe called for these golden, crunchy toppings and said it was the only way to get an authentic depth of flavor in this Korma sauce. I had already tried several recipes in this particular book and was happy with the results, so I trusted that I needed to get these crispy onions if I wanted the recipe to turn out right.

Image from Amazon.com

Image from Amazon.com

I do not have an Asian store here on the island, so I had to purchase online. When the box arrived, as I started to open it, a sweet and savory scent tickled at my nose. By the time the box was completely open, the aroma was taunting me to open the contents inside. I submitted–and sliced open the top of the plastic bag holding in the cripsy tid bits of caramelized onion. I rushed over to the utensil drawer, grabbed a teaspoon, and experienced my first bite. It sort of hit me, the taste that is. It was strong, and meaty. There was a slight brininess that I was not expecting but still sweetly pleasing. I took another bite, and with that my head started spinning with all the ways that these little brown bits could be enjoyed–way beyond adding to my Indian sauce.

These fried onions could be put sprinkled over a salad, added to a sandwich, showered over rice, married with veg on a pizza, included in a stew or sauce, crushed for a breading on fish, artfully dropped atop soup, and my personal favorite, scooped up on a spoon and eaten straight.

If you have an Asian market near you, I highly recommend trying this tasty and versatile version of the onion. If you cannot find them, feel free to use this, or any other link on this page, to purchase through Amazon.com. And yes, I will get a few cents for your purchase, but that has no bearing on why I am sharing this product with you…I promise. I would be just as happy with you buying these golden fried onions in your neck of the woods, and supporting your local purveyor of global food.

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Friday Food Find: Matcha Matcha!

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There are lots of things that you can use matcha in–lattes, smoothies, Popsicles, salads, soups, curries, and of course, tea. In my mind it is similar to ground flax; in that you can add it to a lot of your current recipes for an added nutritional boost. But sometimes, it is also good in something a little more decedent. And that’s where today’s recipe begins…Matcha Drops. More…

There are lots of things that you can use matcha in–lattes, smoothies, Popsicles, salads, soups, curries, and of course, tea. In my mind, it is similar to ground flax; in that you can add it to a lot of your current recipes for an added nutritional boost.

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But sometimes, matcha is also good in something a little more decadent and it has nothing to do with its nutritional benefits. That’s where today’s recipe begins…Matcha Drops.

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Recently, I decided that I was going to send my daughter, who is going to college in Portland, a package each month that was inspired by something in Food & Wine magazine. It would include some product that was touted, something made with that product, and of course the magazine. Having finished reading February’s issue and receiving my matcha in the mail via Amazon, it was time to make my inspired treat so I could package it all up and send to her. I chose matcha for several reasons, but the most important one being that my daughter likes green tea. And I chose cookies as they ship well and it seemed like a fun first package–hopefully making her excited for next month’s!

Matcha Drops
Inspired by Matcha Tea Cake Cookies in February 2015 Food & Wine Magazine

INGREDIENTS

Dry Ingredients

  • 284 grams of flour
  • 2 tsp of baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp of sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp of freshly ground cardamon

Wet Ingredients

  • 150 grams of baker’s sugar
  • 75 grams of coconut oil
  • 75 grams of olive oil
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/2 tsp of vanilla extract
  • 1/4 tsp of almond extract

Addition to Wet Ingredients

  • 12 grams of matcha
  • 2 Tbsp of water

Extras

  • powdered sugar for dusting

MISE EN PLACE

  1. Measure out all ingredients
  2. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper

STEP ONE
Wisk the dry ingredients in a medium mixing bowl. Combine wet ingredients in another medium mixing bowl. Stir matcha and water together to create a paste. You might notice a pungent grassy aroma from the matcha. Don’t worry, it mellows upon baking. Add to wet ingredients. Then combine wet and dry bowls until just combined.

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STEP TWO
Using a small ice cream style scoop, spoon dough onto cookie sheets with 2″ in between. Refrigerate for approximately 30 minutes. Depending on the scoop size, you may have to do this in batches. I ended up with 36 cookies, so I made three sheets. This is also a good time to preheat your oven to 350 degrees.

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STEP THREE
Bake cookies for approximately 12 minutes or when the bottoms are slightly golden. Let cool on sheet for a few minutes and then transfer to cooling racks. Dust, dip, or decorate as you see fit.

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In the end, I dusted some, dipped some, and decorated a few. As for the taste…quite unexpected. I had tried the dough, as I always do, and was left with an herbal, yet dusty, aftertaste. It was not unpleasant, just different. But once cooked, the earthiness had all but gone away and what was left was a bright, sweet, grassiness that was rather addicting. Each drop was tender and moist, but not fragile.

I have high hopes for these little cakes’ ability to travel, so once cooled, they will be packaged and sent off to Portland. But until they are sealed up, I have no doubt that I will be nibbling on them. I’m hooked!

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Friday Food Find: Better Butter

Image is property of Ancient Organics www.ancientorganics.com

Image is property of Ancient Organics
http://www.ancientorganics.com

I would like to introduce you to one of my absolute favorite fats in the world: ghee. Actually, it IS my favorite now that I think about it. But not just any ghee. My personal favorite is Ancient Organics Ghee. I happen to cook my fair share of Indian food and many recipes call for using ghee, so I have tried a few brands over the years, but Ancient Organics has perfected the making of this liquid gold. From the moment you open the jar, as the intoxicating caramel scent waifs towards you, you know this is the good stuff. It is rich, almost decadent. More…

Today marks the first Friday Food Find on Quookie. I hope to share foods, gadgets, etc that I am currently excited about. At the moment, you do not have to worry about whether I am being paid to push this product or that gadget, but if in the future, if I am asked to review any, I will be sure to let you know of any conflict of interest.

And with that said, I would like to introduce you to one of my absolute favorite fats in the world: ghee. Actually, it IS my favorite now that I think about it. But not just any ghee. My personal favorite is Ancient Organics Ghee. I happen to cook my fair share of Indian food and many recipes call for using ghee, so I have tried a few brands over the years, but Ancient Organics has perfected the making of this liquid gold. From the moment you open the jar as the intoxicating caramel scent waifs towards you, you know this is the good stuff. It is rich, almost decadent.

Image is property of Ancient Organics www.ancientorganics.com

Image is property of Ancient Organics
http://www.ancientorganics.com

But what is ghee? Ghee is cooking oil that is prized for its flavor and health benefits—both nutritionally and medicinally.

  • Ghee is the essence of butter after removing all the moisture, milk solids, and impurities.
  • The lack of milk solids may make ghee an option for those with dairy issues
  • The absence of milk solids and water also make it shelf stable
  • Ghee has one of the highest flash points (485ºF) which makes it great for high-temp cooking
  • Ghee contains Omega 3 & Omega 9 essential fatty acids along with vitamins A, D, E and K.
  • Many believe ghee influences longevity, digestive health, overall energy, and more

And then there is Ancient Organics version. Ancient Organics Ghee is in a class by itself. According to their website,

“We take great care and consideration in the ingredient selection and preparation method. Our uncompromising commitment to quality combined with obsessive attention to detail allows for a unique hand-crafted ghee. Many of the strict protocols for authenticity are integrated into our cooking process.”

After tasting, I believe every word of it. The ghee is cooked in small batches over an open flame. The quality butter that is used in the making of the ghee is also important to the final taste and quality. And if that were not enough, Ancient Organics only produces their artisan ghee during the full or waxing moon in their quiet, mantra-infused kitchen. They believe that the influence of the bright and waxing moon amplifies the elemental healing qualities and taste of ghee. While I do not know the theory behind this thought process, I can tell you that this ghee tastes like no other.

Image is property of Ancient Organics www.ancientorganics.com

Image is property of Ancient Organics
http://www.ancientorganics.com

If you are interested in finding out more about how Ancient Organics makes their ghee, click here.

If you would like to purchase a jar, or two, or three, you can purchase from Amazon or directly from the manufacturer. And remember, I get nothing more than the satisfaction of knowing that you will be enjoying this premium ghee–whether it be on a slice of toast, melted over your veggies, or in a a simply lovely soup such as this Potato Leek Soup that is elevated by the use of ghee and white wine.

Image is property of Ancient Organics www.ancientorganics.com

Image is property of Ancient Organics
http://www.ancientorganics.com